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's stepping up as a possible candidate. stephen colbert. >> i want to put my vote in for him now. god knows the senate could use stephen colbert. >> there's a twitter page, draft page. i can tell you having done a show with him in charleston, he's an absolute rock star in that state. >> now you know why. all right. so could taylor swift be the modern-deo cmodern-day yoko ono? "e! news" online says swift and one direction harry styles budding romance is making band annoyed. styles opted to fly on taylor's private jet may going him irritated. >> taylor's having difficulties in on the dating scenes. >>> is that what we're calling it? >>> and beyonce has signed a $50 million deal with pepsi. it includes a beyonce pepsi can. >> there's a twitter account asking what if seinfeld were still on the air. some of the best ones, george goes through his beautiful girlfriend's e-mail and discovers all of her exes are short, stocky, and bald. he dumps her immediately. >>> george's parents claim their house was destroyed by sandy. he moves in. jerry breaks up with his girlfriend because she instagrams ever
below, my name is stephen and i have military affiliation. i would like to ask a question that is outside the box. but everything that you are all saying, sort of assumes that there should be some type administered ivy university for the academic achievement, and i would like to throw out to you the idea that every other service provided in our society was to be at that price. therefore when the people who most needed it would determine that they are willing to pay the price for the best education. in fact, a lot of times you have brilliant people who have known me to go to university, and they are going to get very little out of it. and it may be the weakest student gets the most out of the education. my question to you is why is this in any discussion, what i have just said of affirmative action or education? is pretty clear that the customers and the situation are really not customers, the beneficiaries were the customers. >> part of that should be directed to alan. do you get your moneys worth out of higher education today we met. >> if they come to my classes, they de
of the page. >>> university of pennsylvania professor stephen hahn discusses his book the political world of slavery and freedom. that's next on booktv. he argues historians have presented an incomplete picture of african american emancipation and struggle for civil rights that followed. professor hahn was interviewed at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia as part of book tv college series. >> university of pennsylvania history professor steven speed is the author of this book "the and political worlds of slavery and freedom." professor hahn before we get into the subject of the book what is this image on the front cover? >> that's a very good question coming and the answer is i have no idea. the editor and the press proposes it is a very eye-catching image. when i showed it to friends and colleagues to have no idea what it meant. it doesn't clearly relate to anything that took that's how they chose it. it's a really interesting photographs, and i think it speaks to complex connections within the african-american communities that involved gender as well as power but beyond that
carolina governor nikki haley will pick to fill jim demint's senate seat. our pal stephen colbert put his mind to it. >> but who will she pick? let's see, you want somebody young, somebody conservative, somebody from south carolina, maybe somebody who had a super pac. wait a second. watch where you point that thing. it's powerful. i know when i look at the u.s. senate, i say to myself, you know what they could use? another white guy. >> well, the governor responded on her facebook page saying, stephen, thank you for your interest in south carolina's u.s. senate seat and for the thousands of tweets you and your fans sent me, but you forget one thing, my friend. you didn't know our state drink. big, big mistake. well, she was referring to this from earlier this year. >> what's the state drink? >> there's a state drink? >> it's milk. >> i didn't realize my state was so boring. >> makes me think i'm going to like the person she picks a lot less than i do steve colbert. >>> the fiscal cliff. if it's down to the president and john boehner deciding this, what does a win look like for both sides?
at the ground up. all the way up. [inaudible] let me talk about stephen's case, which he brought in the federal district court in new jersey. this was a man whose wife was a math teacher in high school. she had a healthy pregnancy. she remained in the classroom until the ninth month she went to the hospital to give birth, and the doctor came out and said, you have a healthy baby boy, but your wife died from an embolism. he was determined that he would not work full-time until the child was in school full-time. he would earn a minimum he could make, and combined with social security benefits, make a living for himself and his infant son. we went to the social security office. they said we are very sorry, but these are mothers benefits. they are not available. they are available to widowed mothers, but not widowed fathers. i came to know about stephen's case when he wrote a letter to the editor, and he said i've been hearing a lot of talk about women's this. this is what happened to me. how does that fit in? tell my story to gloria steinem. so at the time i was teaching at rutgers, the state univ
wanted to do. one of the historians who studied, i think it was -- stephen, said if jefferson hadn't decided to make it rather reckless investment of $30,000 in an outcome he probably would've been able to ride out the financial storms of the early 19th century. and another analysis of the financial records show that jefferson, a slaves actually were very productive farmers. and that in one of the first decades of the american agricultural economy, jefferson lost very little money on his farming operation. and so, the slaves were really holding their phones when commodity prices were plunging, and so, i mean and jefferson just kept spending -- the nail in the coffin for him financially was when he had alone with his in-laws. nicholas was speculating in kentucky land acquisitions, and he needed someone to cosign a $20,000 note and he talked jefferson into it and then six months later he went bankrupt. that's when the letters from monticello grill begin to get gloomy. -- really begin to get gloomy. >> i want to follow up -- >> we have a circulating microphone. >> all right. well, i w
the performances, comedians chris rock, stephen colber and jimmy fallon came on to highlight areas hit hard by sandy. and then every decent milestone i hit in my life came down the jersey shore. first kiss. first cheese steak. first time you saw somebody break an ankle at one of those crazy trampoline parks that was just cement and trampolines. who wouldn't die at that? >> well, by far the biggest laughs of the night came from an adam sandler new classic moment. the where he write of the song hallelujah. with a little help from piano with the late show's paul schafer. he tells sandy "screw ya." ♪ hallelujah sandy screw ya ♪ ♪ we'll get through ya ♪ because we're new yorkers ♪ because we believe this too shall pass ♪ ♪ like when sanchez fumbled into an ass ♪ and into the playoffs a-rod telling girls in the crowd i wanna do ya ♪ ♪ the mets have sucked since '86 ♪ ♪ i isaiah tried to ruin the knicks ♪ but now jason kidd and the boys can freaka school ya ♪ ♪ hallelujah ♪ sandy screw ya let me hear you. we'll get through ya because we're new yorkers ♪ >> good to
to play. eagles at the redskins' 5. foles can't find an open receiver. he gets taken down by stephen bowen. intentional grounding is called. time expires with a ten-sengcon runoff and the redskins win their sixth straight game. with more from philadelphia, here is dan hellie. >> reporter: so the redskins one step closer to becoming the first team to make the playoffs after a 3-6 start since 1996. today their sixth straight win, their fourth straight against an nfc east foe, but it didn't take long for them to turn their attention to what's next. how long was it until after the game was over that you were think being the cowboys? >> oh, walking off the field. walking off the field, trying to figure out what's going on. this is what it's about. this is what it's about, to have something to play for, to win the division. i've been here going on five years now, so, you know, to finally have something to play for at this point in the season is very exciting. so you best believe we will be laying it all on the line next week. >> i'll probably think about the cowboys after we land but i think, yo
,000. nor another 330,000, another $320,000. and finally stewart stephens who was the chief strategist for the campaign has a little company that was paid -- okay? for the tellevision advertising, $173 million. now, that goes off into t.v. advertising, but the point is stewart stephens in addition to his salary gets 15% of that. >> whoa. >> for being the conduit for the ad. so, you know, >> peter: in addition to his salary? >> bill: right. so the whole picture to me sayssays a couple of things. first of all, about military romney ain't the good businessman that we thought he was. right? he was certainly not on the top of the way they were spending money. the other thing it says about these campaign consult ants i think it is important for us to recognize recognize. they are in it for the money. they are not in it out of loyalty to the candidate. they are not in it because they believe in the cause. they are in it for the money. it's not first case. i have known other people like this who run losing campaigns and make so much money they never have t
would you feel? >> just on the j.f.k. assassination thing. i just read one of stephen king's new books which is about the assassination and a man who has the ability to go back in time and tries to stop the assassination of j.f.k. does that mean we should put a thing on the front and say this didn't happen? at what point is it someone's responsibility to find out whether there is a backing up of that argument. it seems ridiculous when it's about time travel because there is no time travel yet. to a lot of people that would be absurd, where is that line? it's a gray area. >> i think the answer to somebody who will look at -- watch "24" and say see didn't i tell you americans are torture mongers. it goes to the old question of what is the effect, what's the cause and what's the effect of art and on public perception and behavior. would i personally feel responsible? i thought about it and i do think we all bear some responsibility but not complete responsibility. so somebody who doesn't have a critical capacity to turn on a television and realize this is fiction, this is not a representa
were talking about stephen crane and conrad. the writers' room which can be one of the great places of creativity in america, a writers' room on a good show. listen. we were all at various stages of having dropped out english departments one way or another. that's how you get to los angeles. the subject of dickens was always coming up. we were writing about cities, writing about crimes, writing about crops. dickens was one of the first people to notice how interesting a policeman is standing between the legitimate and the ill lee might jat in a city. the conversation turned off as a popular writer, we're writing for television. so was he. when he talk about the fact that people... when simon talked about the fact that the weekly part would be read allowed to others in the family living room by dad it resembles nothing so much as an american family gathered around a character set with undischarged energy. the great thing is that you then have to master it. unlike shakespea. must allow the character to pen great into your soul as it were. with dickens you have to hang to mrs. gamp if
arrest in the benghazi, libya counsel attack that killed ambassador chris stephens and three other americans. reporting from cairo egypt, our reporter. >>> >> reporter: egyptian sources tell nbc news they have a man in their custody they believe is connected to the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi on september 11th and killed four americans including ambassador chris stephens. according to an e judicial source the man is identified as being in his late 30s. he is known to egyptian intelligence officials for his connections in the past with extremist groups in egypt and libya and his connections with groups in afghanistan and iraq. after the country's revolution he managed to escape from a prison where he was being held. it was shortly afterwards he emerged on this scene for egyptian intelligence officials who say he began trading in arms between libya into egypt and then ultimately onto gaza. right now there's no indication what role he may have played precisely in the attack on the u.s. consulate. he is being held in egyptian custody. there were some conflicting reports as
about poor people. you rarely get a chance to understand their desperation. this from stephen, he should focus on things that can realistically be done to get off food stamps. show that it's not beneath someone to work at mcdonald's or macy's to get back on their feet. from sara, it's not about telling us something, it's about continually raising awareness. from leslie, he may be doing it for the right reason, but i know elderly people that live like this for years. i don't see what one week will prove. now, six months, that's a different story. keep the conversation going. i'll be right back. the writer's desktop and the coordinator's phone are working on a joke with local color. the secure cloud just received a revised intro from the strategist's tablet. and while i make my way into the venue, the candidate will be rehearsing off of his phone. [ candidate ] and thanks to every young face i see out there. [ woman ] his phone is one of his biggest supporters. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center... working together has never worked so well. bp has paid ove
.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor for the yale law's journal. after clerking for stephen breyer when he was judge of the u.s. court of appeals for the first circuit professor amar joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor amar is a coeditor of the leading constitutional law casebook, decision-decision- making and is th author of several other books including the constitution and criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution a biography and most recently america's unwritten constitution, the president's and decibels we live by. the honorable clarence thomas has served as an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states for nearly 21 years. he attended conceptual cemetery and received an a.b. from the college of the holy cross and his j.d. from yale law school. he served as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977, an attorney with the monsanto company from 77 to 79 and legislative assistant to senator john danforth from 1979 to 1981. from 1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil right
that connection. so the whole idea you bring up, stephen, that you believe that -- to connect the taxes they are paying with what they are getting in some respects, i agree with you and that is one of the challenges. on the first point, i take exception to you saying that my request for raising the cap on social security is a knee-jerk reaction. knee-jerk reaction is a description of somebody just sort of making a decision without thinking about it. i have put a lot of thought on the issue. you and i may disagree on the best solution but i put a lot of thought into it and i think it is the best solution. it may be a solution i am not successful at achieving in terms of a final deal. but if you want to look at the long-term solvency of social security, it is a great way to address it. >> -- host: just a few thoughts, first from our facebook page from a viewer. guest: on the first point about dreams versus reality, i think that what happened last night on capitol hill, the house republican conference will, in fact, help folks realize that it is going to take a bipartisan bill. you can't r
and stephen breyer are frequently mistaken for each other. if you know what they look like they don't look anything alike. but people only have a vague sense and one time not too long ago, justice souter was driving from washington to his home in new hampshire. he stopped at a restaurant to get something to eat. and the couple came up to him and the guy said, you are on the supreme court, right? and he said, you are stephen breyer, and he didn't want to be embarrassed in front of his wife, so we said yes, i am stephen breyer, i am stephen breyer, and then they chatted for a little while and the guy said, what is the best thing about being on the supreme court? and he thought for a minute and he said, i would have to save take the privilege of serving with david souter. [laughter] how could you not love a guy like that. so i'm taking nominations for my favorite justice. okay, let's talk about the current supreme court by the numbers. well, there are six men and three women. first time in history there are three women in court. [applause] there are six catholics and three jews. no applause f
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)